Selecting Effective Product Claims in CPG/FMCG


Posted on 1 May 2019


What is a claim?

A claim is an assertion about a product across any channel, such as; advertising, digital promotions, public statements, or product packaging.

What is not a claim

  • Logo
  • Pricing
  • Consumer insight

Claims by content

We can group claims by their content into three key categories, which are; benefit, reason to believe (RTB) and targeting.

Benefit     Reason to Believe     Targeting     

The benefit can be broken down further into four sub-categories that are most commonly seen as driving benefit for the consumer, which are; feature/flavor, functional, emotional, and societal/moral. The reason to believe (RTB), can be commonly seen as; sourcing or appellation, process, ingredients or composition, certification, and experience or branding. Targeting is commonly seen as; for a specific occasion, and for a specific person, with all other categories grouped as such.

Benefit     Reason to Believe     Targeting     

Alternatively, you can group claims by; feature/flavor, process, for a specific person or other.

Table


Three noteworthy linguistic factors

1.) Length of text

When testing claims, the team at Conjoint.ly often see the below trend emerge where indicative willingness to pay strengthens in line with the length of characters in the claim. While limitations such as space on the packaging or number of claims on the packaging may limit your ability for longer claims, it is worth considering when ideating. An alternate hypothesis for this trend could also be that a longer claim simply present more informative facts which in turn are more persuasive.

Indicative Willingness to Pay

2.) Substitution for a similar statement

Substitution for a similar statement can be just as appealing to consumers and may potentially reduce manufacturing costs. Consumers react very similarly to the below example, although the manufacturing process can be cheaper when referring to the second claim.

Substitution for a similar statement

3.) Neologisms

A newly created name which lacks any prior meaning is known as a neologism which can be helpful to; help describe the chemical makeup of a product, and simplify complicated names or define a scientific process, amongst others. Neologisms can be very powerful when used within claims and can be seen to perform strongly with old and new products alike.

Neologisms


Ways to test claims in surveys

How do you show claims?

Types of responses



MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: Common survey flow


MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test survey flow
MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test survey flow
MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test survey flow



MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works

MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works
1.) List of claims


MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works
2.) Respondents identify best and worst options in each question of claims


MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works
3.) All claims ranked with good certainty



MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How adaptive choice works

MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works
1.) List of claims


MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works
2.) Respondents identify best option in each question (not worst) and survey adapts to focus on more promising claims


MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: How MaxDiff works
3.) All claims are ranked, with greater certainty for top claims



What’s wrong with MaxDiff


X “Worst” is not very relevant because we are usually interested in “best”

X Usually, not mobile friendly

X Unnatural task for respondents, takes longer

X Standard MaxDiff does not adaptively eliminate worst options

Cost savings from Adaptive Choice


MaxDiff vs adaptive choice-based test: Typical cost savings

Testing combinations of multiple claims: Structure of inputs

Testing combinations of multiple claims: Structure of inputs

Testing combinations of multiple claims: Outputs for individual claims

Testing combinations of multiple claims: Outputs for individual claims
Testing combinations of multiple claims: Outputs for individual claims

Testing combinations of multiple claims: Outputs for combinations

Testing combinations of multiple claims

Test up to 300 product claims

Do you want to efficiently test up to 300 product claims on customer appeal, fit with brand, and diagnostic questions of your choice? Conjoint.ly Claims Test is a powerful comprehensive methodology for testing up to 300 product claims that helps you identify the most convincing claims for your brand or product category.


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